MBS Blog #33–The Hero’s Journey (guest blog by Jared Egol)

Written by Dr. Schubiner on March 21, 2011 – 9:14 pm -

This blog was written by a friend and writer, Jared Egol.  He writes eloquently about the patient’s history as “story” and the concept of “narrative medicine,” i.e. seeing the patient’s story as critical to healing.  When the person with Mind Body Syndrome sees that they are, in fact, the “hero” of the story, they will be much farther on the road to recovery.

To your health, Howard Schubiner, MD

The Hero’s Journey as Story: The Irreducible Diagnostic Criterion
by Jared Egol

The patient, in present times, faces chronic, painful and dismissively mistreated and misappropriated syndromes of stalled emotional progress. Despite seeking to function at our service against pain and a variety of illness, medicine is traipsing feet-first into a biologic-centric approach to the treatment of our stories. Stories are completed, edited, examined, shared and propagated. And, most importantly, they are added to. They are not treated. Any treatment becomes a subscript to the through-line of how our life proceeds postscript. Health, like being human, is raconteurism. It wishes to be resolved and triumphant.

While the scientific community begins to trumpet the mind-body connection as a wellspring for treatment possibility, it seems to passively disconfirm the blunt fullness of what mind-body awareness can be, greater than the sum of its words on paper: that the qualitative first step to treatment starts pre-diagnosis and pre-medicine, at the human condition, which in and of itself is idiopathic. If the mind-body paradigm is to someday be championed as a keystone of accepted treatment in the 32nd century, it must concede that the human condition’s only unit of perceivable measure by outside meters can be its stories, just as atmospheric pressure cannot be interpreted in kilojoules. By dimensional analysis, if spoken words are the sub-units of those stories, then the feelings evoked, hugs had, nods afforded and change experienced by the recipients of them are the units of their transfer: lessons.

I believe that the doctors who rise above the ranks will be those identified as narratorial asides in the stories of the hero –the patient– who takes and imparts lessons in equal measure to the physician. Even the word-bare, thought and action-heavy field of intensive care, which my father occupied himself with for almost three decades, will one day evolve to contain the parameters of narrative in its protocol, even if I don’t know how it will look.

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